Thursday, April 24, 2014

Oft-repeated complaints that our students can't read long and complicated materials may not be as accurate as the observation that they simply don't want to.

A Washington Post article by Michael S. Rosenwald said that researchers were finding that the habit of scanning and skinning material online was changing the human brain and hindering people’s” ability to read long, complex and dense material. Cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham, a professor at the University of Virginia, is highly skeptical. Instead of rewiring our brains, which are not likely to have the capacity to evolve so quickly, it is more plausible that our relationship to content is changing. In other words, oft-repeated complaints that our students ʺcan't read long and complicated materialsʺ are probably not as accurate as the observation that they simply don't want to. It's not brain function at fault but, rather, the will. The counter-argument suggests that the internet provides us with so much opportunity to find other information that we are less willing to put up with something that doesn't interest us or that we find disagreeable. The problem is social, not biological.

Read more...

No comments:

Post a Comment